Gluten Sensitivity Put to the Test

MLM News Nutrition

In 1980, researchers in England reported a series of women with no evidence of celiac disease (the autoimmune disorder associated with gluten intolerance), who nevertheless resolved their chronic diarrhea on a gluten-free diet. The medical profession was skeptical at the time that non-celiac gluten sensitivity existed, and even 30 years later, such patients were commonly referred to psychiatrists. Psychological testing of such patients, however, found no evidence that they were suffering from any kind of psychosomatic hysteria.

The medical profession has a history of dismissing diseases as all in people’s heads—post-traumatic stress disorder, ulcerative colitis, migraines, ulcers, asthma, Parkinson’s disease, and multiple sclerosis. Despite resistance from the prevailing medical community at the time, these health problems have subsequently been confirmed to be credible physiologically-based disorders rather than psychologically-based confabulations.

On the flipside, the internet is rife with unsubstantiated claims about gluten free diets, which has spilled over into the popular press to make gluten the diet villain du jour, with claims like “17 million Americans are gluten sensitive.” However, it must be remembered that the gluten-free food industry is a big business. When literally billions are at stake, it’s hard to trust anybody. As always, it’s best to stick to the science.

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